22 October 2014

Chris Sallquist Makes Smashing Art with His Arts Mashing Style

What is your name and where do you live? 
CS:  My name is Chris Sallquist, and I live in Seattle, Washington.

Your work is unique - you photograph images torn from magazines and then recombine them into new works. Do you use a mobile device to photograph the pages?
CS:  Yes, all of my work is shot and edited on an iPhone. I call my technique “Arts Mashing,” as a nod to the mashup factor in my art. I blend different images and pages from fashion magazines into entirely new compositions. I’m revealing scenes and people that are invisible to the naked eye – almost like an alternate universe.

© Chris Sallquist

© Chris Sallquist
Arts Mashing Lines

Does your work fit into the mobile photography genre since you are photographing existing work? 
CS:  To me, the mobile photography genre is less about the subject matter and more about how you use the phone as a tool to capture and edit images. I call myself a mobile artist, though, not a mobile photographer. 

As an artist I know there is a fine line between violating copyright and creating derivative works. Do your photographs fall under the category of derivative works?
CS:  My work sits on the line, for sure. But my legal team assures me that my pieces are sufficiently transformative to qualify as fully derivative works. My art is intended to highlight the contrast between the glossy perfection of fashion photography and the gritty realities that lurk under the surface. 


© Chris Sallquist
Blossom

© Chris Sallquist

Do you have a traditional photography or art background?
CS:  I have a degree in journalism and advertising, and have worked in interactive design since the early 1990’s, but I’m not a designer. I’ve always been creative though. Before getting involved in mobile art, I wrote a novel, produced four separate podcasts series and performed a series of one-man comedy shows. 

© Chris Sallquist
Correspond
© Chris Sallquist
Farther Wide
How did your current style of work evolve?
CS:  In 2011 I started experimenting with my phone, taking photos of magazine pages that I folded and warped. I edited them in Snapseed, and the results were interesting. I kept at it and after a while my style evolved into the look you see now.

© Chris Sallquist
Kit Kite

© Chris Sallquist
Maryanne is
Does a photograph inspire a project or do you have a concept in mind and then look for the appropriate photo to match the vision in your mind?
CS:  I browse magazines for an image that stands out to me then search for complementary images to mash it with. There’s a lot of trial and error and synchronicity involved.

Have you considered doing the same style using all of your own photographs rather than ripping them from magazines?
CS:  I’m currently collaborating with a photographer on several projects.

© Chris Sallquist
Oh What Sooth

© Chris Sallquist

Have you ever sold or exhibited your work? If not, any plans for the future?
CS:  I started showing my work last year as part of the Shadow Stories exhibit curated by the Mobile Photography Awards. Since then my work has been included in other group exhibits, including a Shooter Magazine exhibit in Porto, Portugal (where I sold my first piece), a Columbus Museum of Art Photo Hunt exhibit, and a mobile photography exhibit at the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition. In October I’m part of another mobile photo exhibit at the Brentwood Road Gallery in Romford, UK. I recently received the Best in Show Silver Award at the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition "Imagine This" - a mobile photography exhibit. 

© Chris Sallquist

© Chris Sallquist

From your website I see that you also do custom portraits. How are these created?
CS:  I use the same process for my custom portraits, except I start with a photo of the person who commissioned the piece. This is slightly more challenging, actually, because people sometimes get uncomfortable when their image is manipulated to the point where they don’t look “normal.” I have to walk the line between creating a favorable image that the buyer will like and not inhibiting myself because they might not feel like they look their best. Sometimes it takes twice as long to create these custom portraits...

© Chris Sallquist

© Chris Sallquist

What piece are you most proud of and why?
CS:  I’m most proud of the pieces that reveal some unexpected twist to the viewer. One of my pieces, called “Some Roarings,” features a stoic looking woman gazing in profile. She appears to be wearing an elaborate, flowing headdress, and her arms are stretched backwards at an awkward angle. If you turn the piece sideways, though, you can see that her headdress and arms are the arms and hair of a woman draped over a red velvet chair. It’s a powerful image that sticks with me.

© Chris Sallquist
Some Roarings

© Chris Sallquist

© Chris Sallquist
Selling Greece
Is there another area of mobile photography that you would like to explore?
CS:  I think animation is a likely next step for me. I’m intrigued with how motion will bring the work to life.

© Chris Sallquist
To Whom and Their

© Chris Sallquist
What Can
Is there anything else you'd like to add?
CS:  This is a really interesting time for me. For 20 years I’ve built a creative career, but nothing has grabbed me more than my Arts Mashing art. I know now what I want to do when I grow up.

Find Chris: Web / Instagram / Facebook

21 October 2014

Call for Entries: Mobile Photographic Creation



From the Website:

The International Symposium Mobile Creation and blog Lanterns have joined forces to launch a call for applications around the mobile photographic creation

Mobile Design is a group of university researchers from laboratory IRCAV / Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle this year focuses on the relationship to art terminals and services with mobile features (phones, smartphones, tablets). 


The symposium and Mobile Arts will be held on 4 and 5 December at the National Institute of Art History (INHA). Landmark of research on the history of art and heritage, near the Louvre, INHA will host in parallel during the two days of mobile photographic art curation.

Our goals?

1) Show that the artists have taken over the mobile, a new tool for artistic creativity and photographic.

2) To illustrate the diversity of mobile photographic art ranging from street photography to selfie, through architecture, black and white, to experimental approaches combining photography and digital painting.

3) Question photography via mobile creation in a prestigious location, the National Institute of the History of Art.

For details on how to enter, visit the website here







Mob Street Tuesday No. 7

It's Mob Street Tuesday again. This Flickr group is growing a bit slower than the Mob Paint group, so be sure and invite your friends to join in with their mobile street photographs. Be sure to visit the Mob Street Flickr Group to see more street photos from around the world.

All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.” 
― Susan Sontag



© ScottyMcagent
© ScottyMcagent


Ladies' Talk © Basak Aytek
Ladies' Talk © Basak Aytek

© bobhos2012
© bobhos2012

Balance Biker © Goh
Balance Biker © Goh


Coiffure © Cecily Mariece Caceu
Coiffure © Cecily Mariece Caceu


Adventuresome Spirit © gcosta9
Adventuresome Spirit © gcosta9

© unaisa momoitio
© unaisa momoitio

Stars to the left of me © Michael Manza
Stars to the left of me © Michael Manza

Ssssstt © AJ vdHorst
Ssssstt © AJ vdHorst

Inner Silence © Michal Koralewski
Inner Silence © Michal Koralewski

Five Hundred Twenty © Connie Gardner Rosenthal
Five Hundred Twenty © Connie Gardner Rosenthal

Silhouetted Friendship © Cattis C
Silhouetted Friendship © Cattis C

Shadows Alive 3 © Vanessa Vox
Shadows Alive 3 © Vanessa Vox

© Eitan Shavit
© Eitan Shavit



street of mind / in the spa © dr pajchiwo
street of mind / in the spa © dr pajchiwo



Round and Round in City Hall © Veevs
Round and Round in City Hall © Veevs

19 October 2014

Instagram Challenge - Shoot With Contrast by Hornbeck

This week's Instagram Challenge is a bit different - all images must be taken using the contrast by hornbeck app. It is available FREE on the app store, but it is limited to iOS devices only. You can use any other apps to edit the image. Tag on Instagram with #aom_contrastbyhornbeck hashtag for a chance to be featured in the Sunday Showcase on October 26th.

Here are some examples of my contrast by hornbeck shots.

© Geri Centonze

© Geri Centonze

© Geri Centonze

© Geri Centonze

© Geri Centonze




Instagram Challenge Showcase - Abandoned

Abandoned

[ ə bándənd ]

  1. empty: left empty because of not being used or lived in anymore
  2. alone: left alone without being cared for or supported
  3. unrestrained: without restraint or self-control

This challenge ran for two weeks because I was out of town last weekend. There were so many wonderful entries it was difficult to only select a few for the showcase. Please click on an image to view the photographer's Instagram gallery. 


@onekevmoore
@onekevmoore

@kawol1
@kawol1
There are so many abandoned chairs. If only they could speak and tell us their stories.

@themobilemind
@themobilemind

@vpix99
@vpix99

@patronr
@patronr

@rdepaolo
@rdepaolo

@thelongsilence
@thelongsilence

@before.1st.light
@before.1st.light

@hosscox
@hosscox

@sunflowerof21
@sunflowerof21

@congarose
@congarose

@mauzzan
@mauzzan

@mnolt
@mnolt

@iphone_ok
@iphone_ok

@anikatoro
@anikatoro

@aconica
@aconica

@richardpilon
@richardpilon

@tonyhirtz
@tonyhirtz

@wwgreer
@wwgreer

@trishg61
@trishg61

@cpaustin2000
@cpaustin2000

Below is a view of all the images submitted.




The next challenge will be a bit different. Only shots using the contrast by hornbeck app (FREE on the App Store) - any subject matter. Showcase will be posted on October 26th. Use hashtag #aom_contrastbyhornbeck.